Some of the terms you’ll come across when looking up chainsaws will be huge and perplexing, and you’ll want to scream at your computer screen, “Just tell me how fantastic it is!

Despite their frightening appearance, these words are actually pretty simple to understand if you wrap your head around them.

What is Bar Length?

The bar length is exactly what it sounds like: it’s the length of the bar. If you’re unfamiliar with the term, the bar is the long, narrow object around which the chain is wrapped. Some of you may have the impression after reading this that all it takes to determine the bar length is a tape measure and a chainsaw. This is a blatant misunderstanding.

Only the cutting length of the bar is visible because the chainsaw conceals the majority of the bar’s length.

What Bar Length is right?

So, what’s your ideal bar height? That, of course, is entirely dependent on the type of work you intend to accomplish. It’s unlikely that your bar will be able to cut through the wood you need to if it’s too small. A high amount, though, can be difficult to manage.

  • Light labour like trimming and pruning requires a bar that is between 8-16 inches wide.
  • The optimal bar length to use when cutting down a small tree or removing huge branches from a tree is between 16 and 18 inches.
  • For medium-sized trees, such as those that have been downed by a storm, an 18-20′′ bar length will do the trick.
  • You’ll need a 20-24″ bar if you want to take down larger trees.

You can find out bar length even if you don’t know much about arithmetic. Bar length is a simple concept.

It’s far more difficult to do Cross-Commenting (CC). A unique formula is used to calculate it.

What is CC?

The term “CC” refers to the engine’s cubic centimeters (CC). In other words, the more CC a chainsaw has, the more powerful the engine is. This makes it easier to use.

The CC of any engine can be calculated using a specific formula. Because it will be in your chainsaw production guide, you won’t have to worry about it.

the product of 0.7854 x the second bore, the second stroke, and the quantity of cylinders.

0.7854

Do you recall the formula A=r2? You may also get the area of a circle by multiplying the Diameter2 by 0.7854. The cylinders on all engines have circles on either end, therefore this is required.

Bore2

A cylinder’s bore is, to put it simply, how wide the cylinder is. For all intents and purposes, the diameter of the cylinder’s inner circle. Just be certain to cut it in half (times it by itself).

Stroke

The length of the cylinder’s stroke is considered the stroke length in this context. All the way up to the other circle from one of the circles.

Total Number of Cylinders (PCs)

There is no such thing as a single-cylinder engine. If this were the case, the cylinder’s power would be so great that operating the chainsaw would be deadly. Aside from multiplying by the number of cylinders, you’ll also need to figure out CC while working with engines.

Which CC is right?

As you may have discovered on your own, the CC’s usefulness depends on the task at hand. If the job is small, you can get away with a lesser CC, but if it’s a huge one, you’ll want a chainsaw with a greater CC.

A simple task could be as simple as cutting or pruning a tiny tree. No more than 30cc is required for this task.

Which is more important? Bar Length or CC?

It’s a challenging issue to answer because both of these factors must be taken into account when choosing the right chainsaw

As the chainsaw’s controllability and maximum timber thickness are determined by bar length, it’s critical. In order to get the job done, you need a chainsaw that can cut through the wood without leaving a splintery trail, but you also don’t want one that is difficult to man oeuvre.

The chainsaw’s cutting capacity (CC) is critical since it influences the tool’s overall power. You wouldn’t want to use a 50cc saw for light trimming because it’s too strong and hence risky to operate.

Recommended Readings (Power Tools Bible)

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